Is there value in pursing a higher education?

By Mark Storer, Bay Area News Group, April 26, 2015

  • most important thing to learn in college had more bearing on who he/she is rather than what he/she does
  • on individual level, when we look only at earnings potential as the value of education, we miss a large part of the picture
  • it is completely possible for education to lead people down a path that does not increase (or possibly even decreases) lifetime earnings, but could lead them to personal and professional fulfillment
  • college is an institution; the location of that institution and the people who make up that institution are the source of the mind expansion, horizon-broadening that takes place during the college years
  • statistical date returned over more than 40 years of research show that those with Bachelor’s degrees or higher earn more than their counterparts who don’t get a degree
  • Does College Matter? (2014 Annual Report) Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco
    • even for entrepreneurs, college is still the best place to develop skills, meet mentors and learn about what it takes to compete in the market
    • college environment is ideal for entrepreneurial-minded students to try out their ideas
    • it’s a pretty safe environment
    • college will hook your up with a mentor, in some cases provide funding and then you get to go out and validate your idea
    • colleges have the sort of perfect ecosystem that will support the pursuit of ideas
    • average college graduate earns enough “extra” to recover the cost of attending most colleges in fewer than 15 years
    • after that, the earnings advantage remains leaving the typical college graduate with a significant net return
    • College Calculator
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The value of higher education from the employer’s perspective

By Maggie Sharpe, Published in Bay Area News Group on April 26, 2015

Before Recession
(Employment)
During Recession
(Employment Decline)
High School 1/2 16%
Associate Degree 1/3 11%
Bachelor Degree 3/4 7%
  • Fullbridge (with offices in San Francisco) – a career accelerator program to help young professional success in the global economy
    • Higher education is the baseline for most employers
    • Companies also look for: internships, work experience, extracurricular activities and career accelerator programs
    • Leadership and participation in skills-building programs
    • Corporations value candidates with confidence and a strong desire to learn
    • hard skills: Excel proficiency, time management
    • soft skills: being able to work with others, work well in teams and eventually become a leader
  • college degree indicates how teachable a person is – value a culture of continual learning; discipline needed to complete the rigors of a structured academic program; ‘bias for execution’ – know how to get things done
  • real-world experience
  • possesses a deep level of functional expertise
  • Eight attributes used by “Energy Recovery” in San Francisco in its annual employee performance appraisal – changing the game (innovation), all in (commitment), problem solving, professional maturity, work ethic/commitment to excellence, effective communication, collaboration, and flexibility/adaptability
  • unique mix of rebellious spirits, distinctive styles and technical know-how and a whole lot of gumption
  • ones that embrace and contribute to company culture, lead by example, and who support and care for one another
  • you can teach people new skills, but you can’t train someone to give genuine heartfelt care
  • look beyond the CV and dig deeper into an individual’s passion, personality and drive
  • people who aren’t afraid to take chance, who want to make a different – people who care about their work impacts others around them
  • higher education provides people with a great foundation for acquiring knowledge, skills and abilities
  • San Francisco State University, College of Business : Bill Kimpton Hospitality Scholarship

Related Reads:

  1. A College Degree Sorts Job Applicants, but Employers Wish It Meant More
  2. What do employers really want from college grads?
  3. Internships become the new job requirement

Higher Education in California

Higher education is education that is provided by universities, vocational universities, community colleges, liberal arts colleges, technical colleges, and other collegial institutions that award academic degrees, such as career colleges.

The higher education in California consists of:

UC

UC

The UC system has 10 major campuses located in Berkeley, Los Angeles, San Diego, Davis, Santa Cruz, Santa Barbara, Irvine, Riverside, Merced and San Francisco. The UC system is intended to accept students from the top 12.5% of college-bound students, and provide most graduate studies and research. It has a combined student body of more than 191,000 students.

California State University

CSU

The CSU system is composed of 23 campuses and has over 450,000 students supported by 47,000 faculty members and staff. It is intended to accept the top one-third (1/3) of high school students.

CCCS

CCCS

The California Community Colleges System (CCCS) consists of 110 community colleges in 72 community college districts serving more than 2.5 million students.

AICCU

AICCU

Association of Independent California Colleges and Universities (AICCU)

Last Updated: October 27, 2008
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Books – Prepare for College

What Colleges Don’t Tell You (And Other Parents Don’t Want You to Know): 272 Secrets for Getting Your Kid into the Top Schools

What High Schools Don’t Tell You: 300+ Secrets to Make Your Kid Irresistible to Colleges by Senior Year

From Here to Freshman Year: Tips, Timetables, and To Dos that Get You into College

The Ultimate College Acceptance System: Everything You Need to Know to Get into the Right College for You

Last Updated: September 19, 2008
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