Impressive Candidate vs. Admitted Student | InLikeMe

Impressive Candidate vs. Admitted Student | InLikeMe
So, who gets in to the most selective colleges and universities? For the most part, admitted students fall into one or more of these three categories:

(1) students who can bring something “special” that the school desires;

(2) those with exceptional promise; and

(3) academically-qualified legacy applicants.

Focus on quality over quantity. We look for the opportunity to pursue (with gusto) one or two interesting projects, activities, and/or areas of research where the student can showcase some combination of leadership, character, determination, intellectual curiosity, talent, heartfelt interest, creativity, problem-solving and/or communication skills, maturity and ability. The “hook” should be genuine and be a good fit with the student’s interests and abilities. A hook can also be developed to either offset an area of perceived weakness or to create positive differentiation.

As an example, one of my clients was dismayed by the lack of intercultural harmony at her public high school. She endeavored to improve the situation by bringing together students to share her love for gardening. She founded a community garden project and encouraged diverse participation. She described her experiences (positive and negative) in various college application essays and was thrilled to gain admission to a number of the most selective colleges and universities.

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UC to wait-list some applicants

UC will again implement a waitlist process for fall 2011 admissions. All campuses except Los Angeles and Merced will use waitlists for their freshman pools. Davis and San Diego also will have a transfer waitlist, and Irvine and Santa Cruz are considering the option for transfers. The university enrolls more than 11,570 students for whom it receives no state funding. A waitlist is an enrollment management tool that enables campuses to attain their enrollment targets with greater precision while offering a space to as many deserving students as possible. What students need to know:

  • They might receive waitlist offers from more than one campus. Students may accept as many offers as they wish. Waitlist offers will be made by the end of March for freshman applicants and the end of April for transfers.
  • Once offered a spot on a waitlist, they must opt in. Instructions for doing so will be included with the waitlist notification.
  • Even if they accept a waitlist offer (or several), students should submit a Statement of Intent to Register (SIR) by the stated deadline to a UC campus or other institution to which they have been accepted. If they later accept an offer of admission from a campus where they have been wait-listed, they will forfeit their deposit at the first campus.
  • Wait-listed freshman applicants will be notified of their status no later than June 1; wait-listed transfer applicants, by July 1.
  • Preliminary financial aid awards will be sent at the time students are notified of waitlist offers. Additionally, SIRs of wait-listed students will be considered on time for purposes of housing and orientation, provided they are submitted by the deadline stated in the offer of admission.
  • Eligible applicants who don’t receive an admission offer from any campus to which they applied will be in the referral pool, even if they are on the waitlist at another campus.
  • Campuses will still consider appeals. Applicants who feel they have grounds for an appeal should submit one, but they should keep in mind that the purpose of the appeals process is to deal with errors and compelling new information and hardship. Students cannot appeal for a spot on the waitlist.

In the fall 2010 admissions cycle, the first time waitlists were used broadly, a total of 11,703 waitlist offers were extended to freshman applicants across all campuses except UCLA and UC Merced. Two campuses — UC Davis and UC Santa Barbara — were the only two campuses to admit significant numbers of students off their waitlists. These campuses yielded more than 40 percent of students admitted off the waitlist.

2011 U.C. UNIVERSITYWIDE ANALYTICAL WRITING PLACEMENT EXAM (AWPE)

This year, UC will administer the AWPE on Saturday, May 14th, to student who have been admitted to the University for fall 2011 and who, by April 1, 2011, have not satisfied the Entry Level Writing Requirement by other means. The cost of the exam is $110; the fee will be waived for students who qualified for an application fee waiver.

Students are not required to take the AWPE is they have a record on file with the University indicating achievement of acceptable scores on:

(1) the SAT Reasoning Test,
(2) the ACT combined English/Writing test,
(3) the Advanced Placement (AP) English Language or Literature examination, or
(4) the International Baccalaureate Higher Level or Standard Level English A examination.

Students also are exempt from the examination if they have successfully completed a transferable college-level English composition course.

Comprehensive information about the Entry Level Writing Requirement and the Analytical Writing Placement Examination is available online at http://www.ucop.edu/elwr. The site explains the examination process and includes previous examinations that can be downloaded and used by students to strengthen their skills in reading comprehension and writing proficiency.

ELM/EPT Placement Tests for Enrollment At CSU’s (California State Universities)

Seniors…..

All CSU’s require incoming freshmen to meet certain Math and English proficiencies through a placement test or SAT/ACT test scores or the scores on the EAP assessments you took as part of your 11th grade STAR Math and English testing last year.

Be sure you meet this requirement — don’t overlook it as in most cases if you plan to attend a CSU in the fall and haven’t met this requirement by May 1, you could lose your acceptance to a CSU.  READ all of the information a CSU admissions office sends to you or posts on your portal.  If you need to take the ELM (Math) or EPT (English) assessment tests, they are only given on certain dates and ONLY at CSU campuses.  You can take the tests at ANY CSU campus, though (so for example,  if you are planning to go to SDSU, you can take them at Cal State East Bay).

For more information on either of these tests (and to learn how to determine whether or not you need ot take them and/or find out where and when they are offered), go to:  http://www.ets.org/csu/about/ .  Don’t wait…check it out now so you are prepared!

Colleges Still Accepting Applications

Seniors, if your college search still does not feel complete, consider some of  the following schools who are still accepting applications:  CSUs: Bakersfield, Dominguez Hills, East Bay, CalMaritime, Humbolt; Colorado State, Oregon State, Washington State, Montana State, University of Nevada, Reno, and Colorado at Boulder. Remember to check each school web site for application deadlines as they do vary.

While the fall 2011 application period has concluded for most CSU campuses, some may continue to accept fall applications. Certain campuses also remain open for applicants for the winter and spring 2011 terms. Individual campus deadlines differ and it is best to review campus postings. For a full list of campuses still accepting applications please visit the CSUMentor Application Filing Status Report.  Choose “Undergraduate” for “Select a level” and choose “Fall 2011″ for” enrollment term and then press the Submit button. Then check out the “Status” column to see which CSU campus still listed as “Open“.

College Inc. – Harvard nets 35,000 applications

College Inc. – Harvard nets 35,000 applications

Harvard received nearly 35,000 applications, a 15 percent increase over last year’s 30,489 — and a 50 percent increase in four years.

Even 30,000 applicants is a big number. It means, essentially, that one student in 50 applies to Harvard.

Stanford netted 34,200 applicants, a 7 percent increase over last year’s 32,000.

Northwestern crossed the 30,000 threshold with 30,529 applicants, an 11 percent increase and double the applicants of 2005.

University of Chicago, which reported a 12 percent increase in applicants, to 21,669.

Penn, too, crossed the 30,000 threshold this year, with 31,600 applicants, a 17 percent increase.

More than 29,500 students applied to Duke, a 10 percent increase. Duke applicants have risen by half in three years.

Dartmouth netted 21,700 applications, a 16 percent increase.

Boston University received 41,734 applicants, a 9 percent jump.

UCLA which got over 80,000 applications this year!

Campus Overload – Web helps admissions officials demystify application process

Campus Overload – Web helps admissions officials demystify application process

Admission staff at Centre College in Kentucky posted a You Tube video detailing how student applications are evaluated by the nine counselors on staff. They call it a “tongue-in-cheek look at a super duper serious process.”